Why the Bow Tie?

Okay, here is the blog that ALL of you have been waiting for.  Why the Bow Tie?  Why do I wear it? Where did it come from?  Do you tie it yourself?

First of all, yes.  My bow ties are real and I tie them myself.  Tying one is very similar to a shoelace, it’s not hard, just takes some practice.

Where do I get them?  Most any place that has ties.  I get most from Belk or similar type stores.  I have a few really “nice” ones from fine men’s haberdasheries, but their quality is not far superior to any others. I have a few from on-line places and several were gifts. Always a good gift. Hint, hint.

Several years ago I was having lunch with Mark Chinn (legal mentor, former boss, and still great friend ) and we were discussing branding. Mark wears nice suits and wears a hat. He has a fedora hat, actually several, and he wears them in part as his style, but also for practical reasons like sun protection.  He is well-known and identifiable by his hat(s).  As we discussed my brand, I wanted something simple, memorable, different and not a hat.

If I had started wearing hats and stood next to Mark in his, I would look ridiculous. Like Twins with Arnold Schwarzenegger and Danny DeVito ridiculous.

What about a bow tie?  We had a firm event coming up, our annual divorce firm Valentine’s party (aren’t we clever), and I thought that would be a fine time to unveil the bow tie.  I went to Mozingo Clothiers, just up the street from my office and with Charlie’s help picked out a fine pinkish, purplish bow tie, that looked quite festive. Charlie showed me how he ties them, tied it for me and I left with the tie pre-tied.  It had buttons on the back, as most do.

As I mulled over wearing the bow tie, I thought, “everyone is going to ask if I tied it…I have to say yes, truthfully.”  I untied it, having never tied a bow tie before and on my second attempt did a pretty fine job, with the help of Charlie’s lesson and a great you tube video.

That night I had lots of compliments and of course, “Did you tie it yourself?”  I crowed “absolutely”.  I have worn a bow tie ever since.

I have had many compliments in Court, at Court, and from Court on the bow tie.  My best story from Court was when I appeared for the first time in front of an out of county Judge, meaning a Judge I do not appear before regularly .  She commented on my tie approvingly.  Court went fine.  I was back in her Courtroom some weeks later and had my back turned as the Judge approached me and asked me to turn around so she could see what color bow tie I was wearing that day. I knew I was on to something.

That is why I enjoy and wear bow ties. To be different, to be remembered and because its my style.

Footballs and Labradors: Wild Custody Battles & Compromises

With High School and College Football in full action it reminded me of some of the lighter, or at least non-traditional, custody battles that I have been involved in.

 

 

Season Football Tickets-  I was involved in a case where the parties were arguing over who got the season football tickets.

The tickets were secured by one party who had been getting them for years, but were actually paid for by the other party, so both felt they had a legitimate claim, additionally both genuinely wanted the tickets. It was not posturing by the wife to get a better deal or more support.  The solution was joint custody.

Each picked certain games that they would attend each year and on the ones that both wanted to attend they agreed to alternate even years and odd years to determine who got to go.  Another interesting aside was that there were 2 tickets for each game.  Who the guest would be was also an issue. Neither wanted the other to be able to take a bf/gf. The compromise there was that the other ticket would be used by a family member or a minor friend of the children. (Minor meaning under 21, not just small).  The custody of the tickets was one of the last issues to get resolved. It really did matter.

Dogs- In a similar vein, I have handled several cases involving pets.  Pets, under Mississippi law are considered personal property (like an item or thing), however the parties are free to treat pets as members of the family should they so elect, and many do.

The parties ultimately agreed on a week-on, week-off custody arrangement for the dog to be with each “parent.”  The agreement also addressed the expenses associated with the dog, including food, care and vet bills. Don’t forget those items!

Almost anything can be negotiated.

Top 12 Fault Grounds for Divorce in Mississippi

MCA § 93-5-1 lists and defines the “grounds” for a fault based Divorce in Mississippi.

A divorce may be awarded based upon;

1). Natural impotency.

2). Adultery.

Unless it was committed by collusion of the parties for the purpose of procuring a divorce, or unless the parties cohabited after a knowledge by complainant of the adultery, which is Condonation (or legal forgiveness).

 3). Incarceration.  Being sentenced to any penitentiary, and not pardoned before being sent there.

4).  Abandonment.  Willful, continued and obstinate desertion for the space of one (1) year.

 5). Habitual drunkenness.


  6). Habitual Drug Use.  Habitual and excessive use of opium, morphine or other like drug.

7). Cruelty.  Habitual cruel and inhuman treatment.

 8). Idiocy.  Having mental illness or an intellectual disability at the time of marriage, if the party complaining did not know of that infirmity.

 9). Bigamy.  Marriage to some other person at the time of the pretended marriage between the parties.

10). Pregnancy of the wife by another person at the time of the marriage, if the husband did not know of the pregnancy.

 11). Incest.  Either party may have a divorce if they are related to each other within the degrees of kindred between whom marriage is prohibited by law.

12).  Insanity.   Incurable mental illness. However, no divorce shall be granted upon this ground unless the party with mental illness has been under regular treatment for mental illness and causes thereof, confined in an institution for persons with mental illness for a period of at least three (3) years immediately preceding the commencement of the action…(see statute for additional language).

These are the grounds for Divorce in Mississippi.  These must be proven through testimony, evidence and corroborated in order to be awarded a Divorce by Chancery Courts in Mississippi.

Matthew Thompson is a family law attorney and knows a thing or two about fault grounds for divorce in Mississippi.

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Divorce, Child Custody & Child Support, Alimony, Contempt, Modification, Youth Court, Adoption and Appeals.

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